Mynydd Llansadwrn Action Group

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This is Mynydd Llansadwrn.

Move your mouse across the picture and see the threat.

Mynydd Llansadwrn: Where is it and why is it important?

The location
Mynydd Llansadwrn (grid reference SN690350) is part of the spectacular undulating landscape of Carmarthenshire in south Wales. Rising slightly above the surrounding hills, it just manages to reach mountain status with a trig. point of 345 metres, but the majority of the Mynydd Llansadwrn terrain stays well below the mountain category. Approximately three and a half miles to the south is the village of Llansadwrn, with its views of the meandering Towy river and the Black Mountain of the Brecon Beacons National Park. The villages of Llanwrda, Porthyrhyd and Caio all lie within a radius of about three miles from the trig.point.

To see a map of the location, click here.

The landscape
The lush green countryside surrounding Mynydd Llansadwrn primarily supports sheep and cattle farming. This unique landscape is also a popular tourist destination, attracting those who wish to enjoy the extraordinary variety of wildlife, the tranquillity and the unspoilt beauty of this part of Wales.

The environment
Mynydd Llansadwrn provides a safe habitat for many birds including several endangered species such as red kites, nightjars, curlews and goshawks. Bats,badgers and hares, all protected species, are also common to the area.

At the foot of Mynydd Llansadwrn is the Cwmerchon conservation centre and farm, recent winners of the David Bellamy conservation award. Nearby Cors Farlais, a 28-hectare area of common land, has been classified as a Site of Special Scientific Interest (SSSI) because of the abundance of wildlife, plant diversity and its unique geological feature - the pingo, a small circular hillock with a crater indentation formed during the last ice age.

The beauty
Mynydd Llansadwrn and the surrounding area is blessed with some of the most beautiful landscape in Britain. The gentle rolling hills are a patchwork of green fields and woodland. Traditional farmhouses nestle into the hillsides and along the river valleys; quiet country roads twist their way through the remote countryside. Castle ruins add a touch of grandeur to the rural tranquillity. The splendour of this area is valued by residents and visitors alike, and will hopefully be preserved for future generations to enjoy.

The threat
Mynydd Llansadwrn was under threat from the development of three giant wind turbines during 2003. Developers approached Carmarthenshire County Council with a proposal to erect three 91-metre high (300-feet) wind turbines on the top of Mynydd Llansadwrn. A planning application has not yet been submitted. The developers of the proposed Mynydd Llansadwrn project say they would need 15-foot-wide access roads to carry heavy machinery and equipment to the site; they would also need to drill into the bedrock to a depth of 10-12 feet in order to build huge concrete pads needed to support each turbine. There would also be cable trenches or pylons to carry the transmission lines to the grid. This would be a major construction project that could have devastating environmental consequences.

Local response

In June 2003, the developers set up monitoring masts near the proposed site. It was at this point that local residents became aware of plans to erect wind turbines. They sprang into action. In July there was a well-attended public meeting at Llanwrda Village Hall to inform people about this proposal. Out of this meeting the Mynydd Llansadwrn Action Group was formed. Current membership is over 200.

Since then, there have been several more wind farm proposals and planning applications in Carmarthenshire and surrounding counties. For a map of all proposals, applications and developments in Wales go to the CPRW site: www.cprw.org.uk/windStats/plotter/literalImageMap.aspx

On 27 March 2007, the Council met to decide on the re-submission of the Blaengwen wind farm application. The Planning Committee voted 12 to 7 in favour of the scheme. This time, the application did not have to go before the Departures Committee for final approval the Departures Committee had been disbanded a few months prior to this hearing!

In September 2009, construction started at the site near Pencader on the western edge of  Brechfa forest. Click here to see a map of the location and click here to see photos from the site.

For more details contact brechfaforesteag@yahoo.co.uk

Nuon Renewables wants to build up to 100 giant wind turbines over a huge stretch of land between the Neath, Dulais, Afan and Rhondda valleys. The Pen y Cymoedd wind energy project would be built in the Coed Morgannwg forestry estate to the south of the Heads of the Valleys road (A465) between Neath and Aberdare; to the north of Maerdy, Treorchy and Glyncorrwg, and to the east of Tonmawr. If approved by the Department of Energy and Climate Change (DECC), the wind farm could be up and running by 2012/13. It is expected to generate up to 290MW .

Home

Mynydd Llansadwrn

What the politicians say

Latest News

Wind Turbine Facts

Renewable Energy

Energy Conservation

The Action Group

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