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A big wind farm protest rally was held in Cardiff on 24 May 2011 to coincide with the opening of the new Welsh parliament. About 2000 protesters from all over Wales made it the largest ever protest outside the Welsh Assembly buildings (The Senedd)

 

See Conservation of Upland Powys for photos:

CUP photos:    http://www.facebook.com/media/set/?set=a.121931871223063.29153.108291759253741

Fan photos:      http://www.facebook.com/photo_search.php?oid=108291759253741&view=all

 

 

Wind Farm Rally News stories: 

*** See recent news stories from the national press further down this page. ***

Date set for wind farm protest rally:

http://www.countytimes.co.uk/news/102267/date-set-for-power-protest-rally-in-cardiff-bay.aspx

 

Four men walk to Cardiff in Powys power plan protest:

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-wales-mid-wales-13445471

Update for Day 1 - click here

Update for Days 2-4 - click here

 

Nice photos here:

http://www.facebook.com/photo.php?fbid=10150612581395333&set=o.108291759253741&type=1&ref=nf


 

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PETITIONS

1)     e-Petition on National Assembly for Wales web site: 

Click the button below to link to read and sign petition.

go to the HM Government website to sign the e-petition

                                        

 

RECENT NEWS STORIES

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30 November 2011

Couple settle with wind farm operators over 'unbearable noise'

A couple have settled a High Court damages action against the owners and operators of a wind farm they say drove them from their farmhouse home with its ''unbearable'' noise. Read more

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

23 May 2011:  

Lord Carlisle Calls to Scrap TAN 8

 

National Grid Launch Pylon Design Competition

Channel 4 news reports, "The iconic steel electricity pylons that line motorways and spans valleys are due for a major makeover. As Tom Clarke reports, a competition is aiming to make the network more 'visually pleasing'." Read more

 

22 May 2011:  Wales is in danger: why isn't the Prince of Wales saving it?

James Delingbole, in his Telegraph blog,  writes about the futility of wind farms, the government's renewable energy policy and the forthcoming protest in Cardiff. Read More

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21 May 2011:  

Wales in revolt over mammoth wind farm scheme

Christopher Booker writes in The Telegraph about the forthcoming wind farm demonstration in Cardiff on 24 May 2011. Read More

 

300 miles of pylons to blight countryside

David Derbyshire in "Mail Online" writes about the hundreds of miles of pylons that are set to blight come of Britain's most beautiful countryside.

 Read more

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19 May 2011: Iolo’s ‘direct action’ warning over pylon plans

 

Iolo Williams, a celebrity wildlife broadcaster today said he would be prepared to take “direct action” against plans to build hundreds of giant pylons and a substation in picturesque Mid Wales. Read More 

 

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18 May 2011: Carbon Pledge will Double Energy Bills

 

Energy Secretary Chris Huhne yesterday committed Britain to “exceptionally ambitious” cuts in carbon emissions despite warnings that they could help double domestic energy bills in a decade, reports the Daily Express. For full article, click here

 

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13 May 2011: Welsh minister rejects wind turbine on common land

 

The Minister for Environment, Sustainability and Housing has refused consent to Awel Aman Tawe to erect a wind turbine, hard standing and access tracks on Cefn Gwrhyd Common near Tair Gwaith in South Wales. The threatened common is in Neath Port Talbot Borough Council.

 

On behalf of the environment minister, Mr Stephen Jones, deputy head of the planning division’s decisions branch, wrote: 

‘I consider that the proposed access road and wind turbine would not, because of their adverse effect on the open character of the land and its value for recreation and public enjoyment, be of benefit to the neighbourhood.’  

For full article, click here

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29 January 2011: Environmental Effects of mining rare earth metals

 

Renewable energy technologies use rare earth metals to make them more efficient. Neodymium is used to make the most powerful magnets in the world. Electric motors and generators rely on the basic principles of electromagnetism - the stronger the magnets they use, the more efficient they can be. With the rise of renewable energy technologies the use of neodymium has come to prominence -  for use in hybrid cars and wind turbines. A top capacity direct-drive permanent-magnet generator for a modern day wind turbine can use 4,400lb of neodymium-based permanent magnet material.

If you think renewable energy is green, see the Daily Mail article about the devastating environmental effects of mining rare earth elements in China - in the Inner Mongolia area. Did you know that China supplies well over 90 % of the world's rare earth metals?

 

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  • November, 2010: Wind turbines, infrasound, and health effects

    Fresh research from the USA recently presented in Canada shows that infrasound from wind turbines can have health effects. “Infrasound: Your ears ‘hear’ it but they don’t tell your brain. Physiologic pathway exists for infrasound at levels that are not heard to affect the brain. The idea that infrasound effects can be dismissed because they are inaudible is incorrect.”

    Research published by Alec Salt, PhD, Department of Otolaryngology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, Missouri, USA, at the “Symposium on Adverse Health Effects of Industrial Wind Turbines,” Picton, Ontario, October 29-31, 2010.  (See the Cochlear Fluids Research Laboratory site, and “Responses of the Ear to Infrasound and Wind Turbines.”

    Click here to read a summary of the paper, and here to download the Power Point presentation (1.18 MB)..

  • September 12, 2010: An ill wind blows for Denmark's green energy revolution.

From the Sunday Telegraph.

Denmark has long been a role model for green activists, but now it has become one of the first countries to turn against the turbines. To green campaigners, it is wind farm heaven, generating a claimed fifth of its power from wind and praised by British ministers as the model to follow. But amid a growing public backlash, Denmark, the world's most wind farm-intensive country, is turning against the turbines.
Last month, unnoticed in the UK, Denmark's giant state-owned power company, Dong Energy, announced that it would abandon future onshore wind farms in the country. "Every time we were building onshore, the public reacts in a negative way and we had a lot of criticism from neighbours," said a spokesman for the company. "Now we are putting all our efforts into offshore windfarms."
 
Even as parts of the British Government continues to blow hard for wind, other countries seem to be cooling on the idea. This summer, France brought in new restrictions on wind power which will, according to the French wind lobby, jeopardise more than a quarter of the country's planned windfarm projects.

For the full article see: www.telegraph.co.uk/news/worldnews/europe/denmark/

  • August 26, 2010: The Renewables Obligation.

    Written by Dr Eamonn Butler,  The Adam Smith Institute.

    On every gas and electricity bill that UK households receive, there is a hidden tax. A tax of more than 8%. It's called the Renewables Obligation. Energy companies are obligated – that is, they are forced by the government under pain of fines and imprisonment – to spend a chunk of their revenues developing and installing non-fossil energy production systems. That means they are forced to pay for things like wind factories, photo-electric technology and wave power, whether or not they think these generation methods have the slightest value, either to themselves or the nation.

    Like all political efforts to make companies pay for things, the government's plan does not work. The energy companies do not pay for these generation technologies. The cost does not come out of their profits, or their shareholders' dividends. It comes from their customers, naturally. All of us who use energy in the home – and there may be one or two completely self-sufficient households in the UK, but the other 28 million or so do have to buy in gas or electricity – end up paying. We pay this premium on our bills so that our energy companies can subsidise wind farmers. For the full article go to:

www.adamsmith.org/blog/tax-and-economy/the-renewables-obligation/

  • August 24, 2010: Wind Energy Gets Huge Subsidies. So Where Are The CO2 Reductions?

Article by Robert Bryce from www.energytribune.com  This is an extended version of an article that appeared in the Wall Street Journal on August 24.

"Over the last few years, the wind industry has achieved remarkable growth largely due to the industry’s claim that using more wind energy will result in major reductions in carbon dioxide emissions. There’s just one problem with that claim: it’s not true. Recent studies show that wind-generated electricity may not result in any reduction in carbon emissions, or those reductions will be so small as to be almost meaningless.

There are two reasons wind can’t make major cuts in carbon emissions. The wind blows only intermittently and variably; and wind-generated electricity largely displaces power produced by natural gas-fired generators rather than that coming from plants that burn more carbon-intensive coal.

Because the wind is not dependable, electric utilities must either keep their conventional power plants running all the time (much like “spinning reserve” in industry parlance) to make sure the lights don’t go dark, or they must continually ramp up and down the output from conventional coal- or gas-fired generators (“cycling”).

Coal-fired and gas-fired generators are designed to run continuously. If they don’t, fuel consumption, and emissions of key air pollutants, generally increases. A car analogy helps explain the reason: An automobile that operates at a constant speed -- say, 55 miles per hour -- will have better fuel efficiency, and emit less pollution per mile travelled, than one that is stuck in stop-and-go traffic. But the wind, by its very nature, is stop-and-go. The result: minimal or no reductions in carbon emissions by shifting conventional generation to wind."

For the full article see: www.energytribune.com/articles.cfm/5103/Wind-Energy-Gets-Huge-Subsidies-So-Where-Are-The-CO2-Reductions  

July 4, 2010: Primary school forced to turn off wind turbine after bird deaths

A primary school in Dorset has been forced to switch off a £20,000 wind turbine because it keeps killing passing seabirds. (reported by The Daily Telegraph, click here to read the full article here)

The rotary blades on the 30ft (9m) structure have killed at least 14 birds in the past six months. The turbine, at Southwell Community Primary School, Portland, was installed 18 months ago thanks to a grant from the Department of Energy and Climate Change. It provided six kilowatts of power an hour, but its performance was overshadowed by the number of birds killed - far higher than the one fatality per year predicted by the manufacturer. Headteacher Stuart McLeod was even forced to come into school early to clear up the bodies before his young pupils spotted them. "We were told by the manufacturer to expect maybe one fatality a year but it killed 14 in six months so we took advice and made the decision to turn it off".

  • January 3, 2010: "Scarecrow" wind farms put rare birds to flight

Britain’s upland birds are in danger of being driven off hills and mountains by onshore wind farms.
Recent scientific study indicates the extent of  the potential negative impact of Britain's wind farm programme on wildlife. Scientists have found that birds, including buzzards, golden plovers, curlews and red grouse, are abandoning countryside around wind farms because the turbines act as giant scarecrows, frightening them away.

The impact is small now because there are few wind farms but researchers warn that, with hundreds more planned, plus an increase in the size of turbines, the effect could become much worse.

For the full article from the Sunday Times, January 3, go to:

www.timesonline.co.uk/tol/news/environment/article6974082.ece

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Mynydd Llansadwrn

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